Calendar


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8:00 PM

Yannick Conducts Mozart and Bernstein

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Sasha Cooke - Mezzo-soprano
Radu Lupu - Piano
Bernstein - Symphony No. 1 ("Jeremiah")
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491
INTERMISSION -
Schumann - Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61

Looking ahead to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Leonard Bernstein in 2018, Yannick conducts the great American composer’s first symphony, “Jeremiah,” based on the prophet’s lamentations “as he mourns his beloved Jerusalem, ruined, pillaged, and dishonored after his desperate efforts to save it” (Leonard Bernstein), and the young composer’s own struggles with faith. Critics extol Radu Lupu, the “enigmatic and almost willfully individualistic pianist” (The New York Times), as an artist who simply must be heard live. A leading interpreter of Mozart’s music, he performs the mesmerizing Piano Concerto No. 24, in which the composer makes full use of the orchestra. We conclude with Schumann’s Symphony No. 2, which includes “probably the most profound music Schumann ever wrote for orchestra,” says Yannick, “on the one hand very simple, but also heartbreaking in its depth and richness of harmonies."

 
7:30 PM

Philadelphia Voices

7:30 PM, Perelman Theater
Share your voice with us! Join us for an App Launch event on Thursday, May 4, at 7:30 PM at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall. This will be a free and interactive event for the community to learn about composer Tod Machover's new work, Philadelphia Voices, which has been commissioned by The Philadelphia Orchestra. Tod will introduce the new app and other related software that will enable everyone in Philadelphia to contribute to the piece, which will premiere in the spring of 2018. Tickets will be made available on our website beginning at noon on Monday, May 1.
 
2:00 PM

Yannick Conducts Mozart and Bernstein

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Sasha Cooke - Mezzo-soprano
Radu Lupu - Piano
Bernstein - Symphony No. 1 ("Jeremiah")
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491
INTERMISSION -
Schumann - Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61

Looking ahead to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Leonard Bernstein in 2018, Yannick conducts the great American composer’s first symphony, “Jeremiah,” based on the prophet’s lamentations “as he mourns his beloved Jerusalem, ruined, pillaged, and dishonored after his desperate efforts to save it” (Leonard Bernstein), and the young composer’s own struggles with faith. Critics extol Radu Lupu, the “enigmatic and almost willfully individualistic pianist” (The New York Times), as an artist who simply must be heard live. A leading interpreter of Mozart’s music, he performs the mesmerizing Piano Concerto No. 24, in which the composer makes full use of the orchestra. We conclude with Schumann’s Symphony No. 2, which includes “probably the most profound music Schumann ever wrote for orchestra,” says Yannick, “on the one hand very simple, but also heartbreaking in its depth and richness of harmonies."

 
8:00 PM

Yannick Conducts Mozart and Bernstein

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Sasha Cooke - Mezzo-soprano
Radu Lupu - Piano
Bernstein - Symphony No. 1 ("Jeremiah")
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491
INTERMISSION -
Schumann - Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61

Looking ahead to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Leonard Bernstein in 2018, Yannick conducts the great American composer’s first symphony, “Jeremiah,” based on the prophet’s lamentations “as he mourns his beloved Jerusalem, ruined, pillaged, and dishonored after his desperate efforts to save it” (Leonard Bernstein), and the young composer’s own struggles with faith. Critics extol Radu Lupu, the “enigmatic and almost willfully individualistic pianist” (The New York Times), as an artist who simply must be heard live. A leading interpreter of Mozart’s music, he performs the mesmerizing Piano Concerto No. 24, in which the composer makes full use of the orchestra. We conclude with Schumann’s Symphony No. 2, which includes “probably the most profound music Schumann ever wrote for orchestra,” says Yannick, “on the one hand very simple, but also heartbreaking in its depth and richness of harmonies."

 
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8:00 PM

A Journey of the Soul

8:00 PM, Carnegie Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Sasha Cooke - Mezzo-soprano
Radu Lupu - Piano
Bernstein - Symphony No. 1 ("Jeremiah")
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 24, K. 491
Schumann - Symphony No. 2

Now in his fifth season as music director, Yannick Nézet-Séguinis leading the legendary Philadelphia Orchestra into a new golden era. The Financial Times has called him “the most compelling, most accomplished conductor of his generation,” and The New York Times has said the orchestra “...has never sounded better.” The dynamic partnership comes together for two symphonies: Bernstein’s riveting “Jeremiah,” with its unforgettable lament for Jerusalem, and Schumann’s nostalgic and joyous Symphony No. 2.

 
 
8:00 PM

Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Cristian Macelaru - Conductor
Renaud Capuçon - Violin
Liadov - Kikimora, Op. 63
Korngold - Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35
INTERMISSION -
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64

After making a terrific impression in his debut with the Orchestra in 2014, Bolshoi Music Director Tugan Sokhiev returns for this stirring program drawn in part from strong Russian influences. Famous for its ingenious use of a “fate” theme, Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony progresses from a somber beginning to an uplifting, triumphant march in the final movement. It’s Tchaikovsky at his soulful best! We open with Anatoli Liadov’s depiction of a mythical Russian house spirit. And Oscar-winning Viennese composer Erich Korngold infuses his Violin Concerto with Hollywood flair; Frenchman Renaud Capuçon brings his “lean but velvety tone” to a score that lets you “all but conjure up the lovely Olivia de Havilland or the swashbuckling Errol Flynn.” (Los Angeles Times)

 
8:00 PM

Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Cristian Macelaru - Conductor
Renaud Capuçon - Violin
Liadov - Kikimora, Op. 63
Korngold - Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35
INTERMISSION -
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64

After making a terrific impression in his debut with the Orchestra in 2014, Bolshoi Music Director Tugan Sokhiev returns for this stirring program drawn in part from strong Russian influences. Famous for its ingenious use of a “fate” theme, Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony progresses from a somber beginning to an uplifting, triumphant march in the final movement. It’s Tchaikovsky at his soulful best! We open with Anatoli Liadov’s depiction of a mythical Russian house spirit. And Oscar-winning Viennese composer Erich Korngold infuses his Violin Concerto with Hollywood flair; Frenchman Renaud Capuçon brings his “lean but velvety tone” to a score that lets you “all but conjure up the lovely Olivia de Havilland or the swashbuckling Errol Flynn.” (Los Angeles Times)

 
5:00 PM

Tuba/Euphonium PlayIN with Special Ensemble Tubular

5:00 PM,

 Register Here

 

 
8:00 PM

Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Cristian Macelaru - Conductor
Renaud Capuçon - Violin
Liadov - Kikimora, Op. 63
Korngold - Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35
INTERMISSION -
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64

After making a terrific impression in his debut with the Orchestra in 2014, Bolshoi Music Director Tugan Sokhiev returns for this stirring program drawn in part from strong Russian influences. Famous for its ingenious use of a “fate” theme, Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony progresses from a somber beginning to an uplifting, triumphant march in the final movement. It’s Tchaikovsky at his soulful best! We open with Anatoli Liadov’s depiction of a mythical Russian house spirit. And Oscar-winning Viennese composer Erich Korngold infuses his Violin Concerto with Hollywood flair; Frenchman Renaud Capuçon brings his “lean but velvety tone” to a score that lets you “all but conjure up the lovely Olivia de Havilland or the swashbuckling Errol Flynn.” (Los Angeles Times)

 
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8:00 PM

Mahler's Third Symphony

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Karen Cargill - Mezzo-soprano
Philadelphia Symphonic Choir - Women's chorus
The American Boychoir - Boys choir
Mahler - Symphony No. 3 in D minor

Join us in this powerful season ending performance of Mahler's colossal Third Symphony, among the grandest works of all. The Symphony is massive—calling for mezzo-soprano, women’s choir, children's chorus, and full Orchestra. Hear what Yannick calls "…fascinating work of art."

 
8:00 PM

Mahler's Third Symphony

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Karen Cargill - Mezzo-soprano
Philadelphia Symphonic Choir - Women's chorus
The American Boychoir - Boys choir
Mahler - Symphony No. 3 in D minor

We end the season with Mahler’s colossal Third Symphony, among the grandest works of all. The Symphony is massive—calling for mezzo-soprano, women’s choir, and children’s chorus—and with six movements, is the longest piece in the standard repertoire. “It’s a work that, even more than any other Mahler symphony, contains—as Mahler said—the whole world,” says Yannick. “It has the mineral life, the vegetation life, the animal one, the human one—and the afterlife as well. … It’s a fascinating work of art.” This is a rare chance to hear this commanding music in the inimitable hands of Yannick and The Philadelphia Orchestra. A monumental end to our season that you won’t want to miss!

 
8:00 PM

Mahler's Third Symphony

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Karen Cargill - Mezzo-soprano
Philadelphia Symphonic Choir - Women's chorus
The American Boychoir - Boys choir
Mahler - Symphony No. 3 in D minor

We end the season with Mahler’s colossal Third Symphony, among the grandest works of all. The Symphony is massive—calling for mezzo-soprano, women’s choir, and children’s chorus—and with six movements, is the longest piece in the standard repertoire. “It’s a work that, even more than any other Mahler symphony, contains—as Mahler said—the whole world,” says Yannick. “It has the mineral life, the vegetation life, the animal one, the human one—and the afterlife as well. … It’s a fascinating work of art.” This is a rare chance to hear this commanding music in the inimitable hands of Yannick and The Philadelphia Orchestra. A monumental end to our season that you won’t want to miss!

 
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2:00 PM

Mahler's Third Symphony

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Karen Cargill - Mezzo-soprano
Philadelphia Symphonic Choir - Women's chorus
The American Boychoir - Boys choir
Mahler - Symphony No. 3 in D minor

We end the season with Mahler’s colossal Third Symphony, among the grandest works of all. The Symphony is massive—calling for mezzo-soprano, women’s choir, and children’s chorus—and with six movements, is the longest piece in the standard repertoire. “It’s a work that, even more than any other Mahler symphony, contains—as Mahler said—the whole world,” says Yannick. “It has the mineral life, the vegetation life, the animal one, the human one—and the afterlife as well. … It’s a fascinating work of art.” This is a rare chance to hear this commanding music in the inimitable hands of Yannick and The Philadelphia Orchestra. A monumental end to our season that you won’t want to miss!

 
 
 
 
 
7:30 PM

Shanghai Oriental Art Centre

7:30 PM, Shanghai Oriental Art Centre
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Beethoven - Selections from The Creatures of Prometheus
Stravinsky - Petrushka
Brahms - Symphony No. 4
 
7:30 PM

Shanghai International Tourism and Resorts Zone

7:30 PM, Shanghai International Tourism and Resorts Zone
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Jie Da - Dreamland Overture (world premiere)
Tchaikovsky - Selections from Swan Lake
Beethoven - Symphony No. 5
 
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7:30 PM

China National Centre for the Performing Arts

7:30 PM, China National Centre for the Performing Arts, Beijing
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Beethoven - Selections from The Creatures of Prometheus
Stravinsky - Petrushka
Brahms - Symphony No. 4
 
7:30 PM

China National Centre for the Performing Arts

7:30 PM, China National Centre for the Performing Arts, Beijing
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Yuanming Song - Soprano
Hongyao Wang - Mezzo-soprano
Haoyin Xue - Tenor
Shenyang - Bass-baritone
National Centre for the Performing Arts Chorus - Chorus
Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 ("Choral")
 
 
 
 

Calendar

Format: 2017-06-24